RICHARD ELDRED

That took a half a dozen hard throws against concrete from head height. And that was after numerous bending/twisting tests to see if I could break it in my bare hands. I’m happy with that result. #3dprinting #stresstest #shapeways View Larger

That took a half a dozen hard throws against concrete from head height. And that was after numerous bending/twisting tests to see if I could break it in my bare hands. I’m happy with that result. #3dprinting #stresstest #shapeways


Where'd you get your hands on a 3D printer? Also, what's that CAD software you're using that can procedurally create things like that? (Brett) from Anonymous

Hi Bretty,

I used Shapeworks for the printing, one of their material options uses laser sintering which is still too expensive a technology for home use, it cost about $45-50 plus postage though. Made a couple of expensive screwups though, first revision is full of issues, 2nd revision I ordered before I even had R1 in my hands, R3 however when I order it should be about bang on perfect and also a candidate for production if there’s interest.

CAD software is OpenSCAD, it uses a text based language to define geometry but has all of your usual programming tricks modern computer languages have, the slots for instance is a for loop that generates the correct number of slots defined by variables inc. width/clearance/etc. The box with bevelled edges is defined by the filter size plus the wall thickness, which generates the hull of spheres of a set diameter, etc. Only one item is statically defined which is the radius of the cylinder for the finger tab. Everything else is computed from the relationship it has with its neighboring qualities.

It’s pretty neat stuff but very primitive compared to modern CAD software (blocky cylinders, etc.)


Sorry!

Sorry for all the product design spam folks, I dabble in both the art of photography as well as the craft behind it, and in future there will be more posts along those lines. I’ll get back to posting photos soon, I promise :-)


Having gotten rather ropey at there being no good options for storing LEE seven5/RF75/75mm filters, and having spat the dummy, deleted Facebook, and started tinkering in CAD to pass the time I decided to actually do something about it.

Pictured here is a 3d printed holder for 10 filters, the idea is this simple case would sit inside a larger camera bag and keep the most amount of filters in the smallest space possible. Slot design has been laid out so that there is clearance between the case wall and filter slot to prevent scratching on insert/retrieval.

This is revision one, the slot spacing is incorrect, and I originally designed it for third party Singh Ray filters in 75x120 size. revision two is in prototyping stages now with correct slot spacing and designed for the traditional LEE 75x90 size. I will most likely offer both for sale on a Shapeways store once I’m happy with the quality.

I’ll probably offer a selection of different sizes and capacities, one idea I’ve toyed with is a dedicated slot for a 75x75mm solid ND filter as well.

I’ve got a couple of other bits and pieces to support the brilliant 75mm filter system also in the design and prototype stage so watch this space and feel free to drop me a line at complaints@reldred.com if you’re interested or have suggestions!


I got my camera the other day and im so excited to start taking photos! :D from naturebeard

Awesome! Now get out there and shoot!